Population: 190,740

Living in Knoxville, Tennessee:
Tips for Moving and Visiting

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If you've been wondering what it's like to live in or visit Knoxville, the Crowdsourced Explorer community can help. We asked ten people living in Knoxville what someone who is considering moving to or visiting there should know. Here are their pros and cons, tips, and advice:

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10 comments on “Knoxville”

Knoxville is the heart of East Tennessee. It is a place of inclusion and sincerity, and makes everybody feel at home. Knoxville is the home of the University of Tennessee Volunteers, where everybody joins as one. In Knoxville, there are different opportunities for everybody to get involved, whether that’s in downtown Knoxville or the suburbs, you can easily make Knoxville a home.

Johana, says: 2020

The heart of downtown Knoxville is a busy college scene. While that might not appeal to most, the city has its charm. Old City houses many historic sites that have been converted into very popular businesses for both college students and recent graduates. At the heart of the city, Market Square, people can enjoy student-made artwork and delicious dining.

Ricardo, says: 2020

Knoxville is usually considered a small city; however, many of the city’s amenities are on par with what one might find in larger cities. Knoxville is probably best known for the role it played in hosting the 1982 World’s Fair. The event brought visitors from all around the globe.

Knoxville is very residential and very commercial. There are many retail stores and restaurants, all within the vicinity of many clusters of neighborhoods. The city sits in a valley, with many mountain ranges on all sides. The close wilderness provides a green outlet for nature-lovers. The downtown region of Knoxville is very old and quaint, with top-notch restaurants, shops, and cinemas to keep one busy for the night.

Daniel, says: 2020

Knoxville in an incredibly friendly city. However, if you prefer country life you need only travel a short distance to be out of the city and into tranquil rural setting. Knoxville is the ideal place for anyone who wants the best of both worlds. It has a lot of business opportunities within the city limits while the suburbs provide a peaceful retreat.

Knoxville is a smaller city with much to offer. My children have many opportunities in regards to academics and athletics, and kid-friendly activities. One of our favorite outings is to walk down Gay Street and get ice cream at Cruze Dairy Farms.

When you arrive in Knoxville look to the south and take in the spectacular views of the Smoky Mountains. On a clear day their beauty is hard to forget once you leave. If you are from Knoxville and travel elsewhere you miss their beauty but appreciate it upon your return.

The town has lost its character to modernity. The homegrown restaurants are beaten out by a McDonald’s, and the people who made Knoxville are leaving to find their home again in the deeper south. In classrooms, it seems fewer and fewer children have the accent.

Kristi, says: 2020

Knoxville, Tennessee, is a college town, home to the University of Tennessee. Visitors looking for nightlife will find plenty of bars and cafes in the Old City, where many college students frequent. The downtown area offers a more upscale experience, with trendy shops and bars and the unique, independent shops on Market Square. Knoxville is also within driving distance of the beautiful Smoky Mountains, where travelers can experience nature in Cades Cove or visit Dollywood or Dolly’s Splash Country for some family fun.

Briana, says: 2020

In Knoxville, mansions are next to stubborn cow pastures and cookie cutter neighborhoods spring up beside ancient farmhouses. Campbell Station Road is a long winding strip of narrow concrete. There are certain ugly buildings, billboards, even hunks of stone that tell you where I are: the crumbling barbershop before the high school; a Bruster’s on the corner of Middlebrook Pike, near a pharmacy.

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